Anonymous Asked
QuestionHey, um, look. I am a HUGE fan of Motherly Scootaloo. I don't have a tumblr account, but I check in all the time anyway! I just have one question: As great is the story is, you seemed to have stopped including/answering questions. My apologies if you already explained this earlier, but are just going to stop with the asks all together? Or is just on haitus? Either way, I'll still be an unofficial follower of yours. :-) Answer

Well, that’s pretty awesome! Thank you for following Motherly even without a Tumblr. I know there’s quite a few people who do that, so it’s hard to know the exact number of people following Motherly, but it is still really awesome to hear in from you guys from time to time ^_^

As for the asks, yeah, pretty much I entered ‘Season 3’ of Motherly Scootaloo after the Court Case, and I found that using the asks as a crutch to move the story along worked for me at first, but eventually I found myself just cherry-picking the questions I wanted that fit my narrative, or fit the reaction I wanted Scootaloo to have. It was after not having the asks included for key storyline points that I kind of realized something…

Having Scootaloo ‘answer’ the audience took agency away from the character to me. Especially if I’m filtering the answers and asks, and cherry picking which asks have anon magic or gifts attached to them, why do I even have the asks at all?

The problem with Tumblr asks is that they come in from the perspective of the audience. When a story is new and they have no idea what’s going on, they can get easy exposition out of it. If you don’t allow anon magic, it’s easy to make it so they don’t instantly solve any problem or conflict in the story (which they will definitely try to do). So once the audience gains a grasp of the situation, and the audience is in tune with them, it’s easy for the audience to then change the entire storyline by simply revealing something to the characters. The only way to prevent this is to have the characters act dumb, naive, or not heed warnings (which only works once or twice before they start realizing ‘hey, maybe I should listen to them’).

So since, in the end, asks literally contributed nothing to the story I was working on, I decided I could just tell the story without them. And so, with Season 3 I cut out the middle-man and am just telling the story everyone wants to see anyway, and this way it won’t instantly or dramatically change because 1 anon got smart and I had to cut his ask out of appearing in the blog.

I still have asks open for giving me feedback though, that’s primarily what it’s for. While I don’t answer asks on Motherly, I still need the inbox open for things like that. Consider it like an e-mail linked directly to the creator, so you can give him well wishes or thank him for his work. He won’t likely answer, but he’ll appreciate the sentiments.

So yeah, sorry to anyone who liked Motherly as an ‘ask blog’, but I’ve always been more of a story teller, and so I’m telling a story. I hope you guys enjoy it for sure, I know some people have negative opinions about it, but I do it because I see enough people genuinely love it enough that I just have to put my best effort into it always.

I doubt I’ll ever go back to the ‘answering’ days story telling, not unless it’s a non-canon soft intro to a story I’m about to tell or doing FAQ sections after a storyline has ended or something (sort of like how El Goonish Shive does). But that’ll be all.

Also wow that was a mouthful.

QuestionWould you say the next three updates will be the 'Motherly'load? Answer

No, no I would not.

The next three updates for Motherly are gigantic and they scare me.

sockiepie Asked
QuestionSAM YOU CRAZY Answer

I do my best o3o

mission0 Asked
QuestionI'm not sure what Shroom was going on about. I think most of the difficulty will come in group conflicts. How will the group know that they are in a group together? And how do they calculate their chances against the player? Answer

You’re probably thinking of a far more complicated system than I am heh

I’m talking more like, branching paths based on stats more than actively re-adjusting enemies on the fly in-system.

You balance the story and enemies based on if your player can get to that part of the story as opposed to on-the-fly balancing. So the enemies and story is different and balanced to that route, so that the player can level or be challenged towards end-game.

shroom1up Asked
Questionto create such a programm/game you need to actuallygo into Ai tech because you need sommething similar to a doungen master on a table top round. And since we have still many A holes on this planet we should wait for that. and play table top. but has anyone DnD version 1 or two? cause i really want to try the wizards back then. Answer

No I wouldn’t? I could create this system in RPG Maker today if I wanted. It’s a simple stat check.

If character = Level ‘X’ go to script B.

Or

If character = Attack/Defense ‘X’ go to script B

Badabing badaboom I created a story with multiple branching paths based on how good the player is at the game. Now that would require more specific balancing in-game, but I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t be hard to do.

Also I have no idea what you’re asking in relation to DnD.

stealthtoast:

samrosemodblog:

The next time I decide I’m going to make an RPG, I’m going to have the story affected by how strong the player is.

No more going “They have like 40 guys, we’re out numbered and can’t possibly win” when you just spent the last 10 minutes beating off 100 of their minor minions. No more “You’re…

Cool, adaptable stories ftw! Would there be a middle ground though, so not everything is either “You’re too weak” or “You’re strong enough”? It’d take even more extra work, but it’d make the story more believable.

I think a few middle-ground options could present themselves in the story. I imagine certain key moments would be either ‘success’ or ‘failure’ to change it though.

For instance, with facing an army you either do or you don’t. Fleeing would be the option most games have you take, but in this case if you were strong enough you could actually take them.

But for say, a scene where a character ends up caught in a trap. You could have three options of death, injured, or just fine.

I’m having a bit of difficulty thinking up three-chance scenarios right now, but I’m sure given enough time I could come up with more. 

I could imagine creating a really interesting and diverse RPG game out of this. I bet that’d be a lot of fun heh

QuestionLooking at how the CMC are getting cutie marks in motherly Scootaloo... I think it'll piss of Diamond Tiara big time :3 Answer

Who knows how Diamond Tiara will react? She’s certainly a wild card at this moment.

a-random-mod:

samrosemodblog:

The next time I decide I’m going to make an RPG, I’m going to have the story affected by how strong the player is.

No more going “They have like 40 guys, we’re out numbered and can’t possibly win” when you just spent the last 10 minutes beating off 100 of their minor minions. No more “You’re stuck, I can’t pull you out!” when the character has managed to suplex a train. No more “Wow, that was a tough enemy, I’m exhausted” when the fight only lasted 3 turns.

This also gives the player an incentive to do a New Game+ as the story will be different on account of the main character having all of his levels and stats, and being able to ensure the best outcome of the story.

It’d probably be the same as remaking the same game 3-4 times within just one game, but it’d be incentive for all players. Casual players could go through it once just fine, min-maxers and power-levelers would get different outcomes, and completionists would get multiple fun play-through styles.

It just needs a good story to hold up to, which I think I could probably come up with if I thought hard enough heh.

So like how fallout has decisions based on your stats?

Fallout had options based on your stats, that you then chose to act upon. They were all optional, and they mostly only affected small things like what NPCs showed up in what town or what shops had for sale or how locals treated you, etc.

This is like “If you’re level 50 and they have an army of level 12 characters, it doesn’t matter if they’re all level 12, you know for damn sure you could kill 1000 of their soldiers without breaking a sweat, so the story doesn’t treat you like you’re weak and out-numbered, you CAN beat them and the characters acknowledge that automatically in the story.”

It fundamentally changes core aspects of the story, and pretty much actually changes the entire story on account of your hero being an over-powered bad-ass that can’t be stopped. And it’s not an optional thing. If you’re powerful enough to wipe the floor with them, the story acknowledges it without you having a say in the matter.

The next time I decide I’m going to make an RPG, I’m going to have the story affected by how strong the player is.

No more going “They have like 40 guys, we’re out numbered and can’t possibly win” when you just spent the last 10 minutes beating off 100 of their minor minions. No more “You’re stuck, I can’t pull you out!” when the character has managed to suplex a train. No more “Wow, that was a tough enemy, I’m exhausted” when the fight only lasted 3 turns.

This also gives the player an incentive to do a New Game+ as the story will be different on account of the main character having all of his levels and stats, and being able to ensure the best outcome of the story.

It’d probably be the same as remaking the same game 3-4 times within just one game, but it’d be incentive for all players. Casual players could go through it once just fine, min-maxers and power-levelers would get different outcomes, and completionists would get multiple fun play-through styles.

It just needs a good story to hold up to, which I think I could probably come up with if I thought hard enough heh.